State Bar of Michigan
home member area contact us


justice initiatives


      
Michigan Profile 2009: A Compilation of Fast Facts and Data
 print this page | View as a PDF | Back to Criminal Issues Initiative

State Bar of Michigan Criminal Issues Initiative

Table of Contents

ARRESTS AND CONVICTIONS

POVERTY

RESIDENCY

LITERACY



1. Arrests and Convictions

A. How many arrests occur in Michigan each year?

The Michigan Uniform Crime Report (MUCR) is an annual report released by the Michigan State Police. The MUCR compiles the total arrests in a given year from every Michigan county and then organizes the data into statewide and county crime reports. The report is linked to a search engine which allows the user to narrow arrest reports to criteria such as the type of crime, age of arrestees, and gender and race of arrestees.

The most recent general arrest information available is from 2009, with six months of preliminary data available from 2010, and the most recent full MUCR report providing detailed statistics is from 2006.

  • In 2006, there were a total of 301,169 adults arrested in Michigan. In 2007, there were a total of 295,796 adults arrested.
  • Michigan juveniles (aged 16 or fewer years) arrested in 2006 was 30,352. The total Michigan juveniles arrested in 2007 was 27,145.
  • The largest number of arrests for a particular offense in 2006 was 106,590 for the category “all other offenses including drunkenness and vagrancy.”
  • Other notable arrest totals in 2006 include 47,461 for Driving Under the Influence (DUI); followed by narcotic violations at 32,409; assault at 32,405; and larceny at 27,128.

Comprehensive Arrest Reports from the Prior 10 Years

In order to provide a better picture of how many people are arrested in Michigan each year, arrest reports were run through the MUCR database for the last ten years. Total arrests over the ten year period from 1997 to 2007 were averaged to yield an average arrest per year in Michigan during that time period.

  • The average arrest total for adults between the years 1997 and 2007 is 332,165 per year.
  • The average arrest total for juveniles (16 and younger) between the years 1997 and 2007 is 30,532 per year.

Table 1(A)—Michigan Crime Rates 1970–2008

Year

Population

Index

Violent

Property

Murder

Rape

Robbery

Assault

Burglary

Larceny

Vehicle Theft

1970

8,875,083

488,790

51,090

437,700

831

2,402

30,758

17,099

139,398

257,118

41,184

1971

8,997,000

514,197

51,697

462,500

942

2,404

29,703

18,648

151,756

265,951

44,793

1972

9,082,000

487,118

50,425

436,693

999

2,657

26,276

20,493

143,709

249,940

43,044

1973

9,044,000

496,459

52,921

443,538

1,096

3,173

25,569

23,083

143,311

250,638

49,589

1974

9,098,000

593,153

59,993

533,160

1,186

3,377

30,679

24,751

173,215

303,110

56,835

1975

9,157,000

622,707

62,792

559,915

1,086

3,488

32,334

25,884

173,231

327,174

59,510

1976

9,104,000

589,779

58,814

530,965

1,014

3,287

30,284

24,229

151,901

323,243

55,821

1977

9,129,000

530,577

53,381

477,196

853

3,555

23,905

25,068

139,006

288,387

49,803

1978

9,189,000

514,042

53,040

461,002

972

3,636

20,153

28,279

132,716

279,958

48,328

1979

9,208,000

566,015

56,558

509,457

834

4,100

20,218

31,406

138,806

315,211

55,440

1980

9,228,128

616,065

59,014

557,051

940

4,304

22,519

31,251

160,688

342,384

53,979

1981

9,201,000

630,640

59,058

571,582

861

4,366

23,688

30,143

171,331

341,805

58,446

1982

9,109,000

618,001

59,806

558,195

827

4,246

24,699

30,034

165,155

330,031

63,009

1983

9,069,000

587,443

64,993

522,450

910

5,085

25,873

33,125

153,438

302,118

66,894

1984

9,075,000

594,958

68,979

525,979

879

5,880

27,832

34,388

149,209

298,192

78,578

1985

9,088,000

578,566

66,714

511,852

1,018

6,140

26,572

32,984

138,792

297,827

75,233

1986

9,145,000

593,644

73,517

520,127

1,032

6,167

27,550

38,768

138,040

308,894

73,193

1987

9,200,000

594,026

71,772

522,254

1,124

6,184

25,442

39,022

133,602

319,470

69,182

1988

9,300,000

565,847

68,980

496,867

1,009

6,462

22,424

39,085

122,254

305,693

68,920

1989

9,273,000

553,442

65,760

487,682

993

6,624

20,616

37,527

113,579

307,096

67,007

1990

9,295,297

557,232

73,468

483,764

971

7,209

21,752

43,536

106,275

311,153

66,336

1991

9,368,000

575,013

75,232

499,781

1,009

7,372

22,790

44,061

111,126

324,985

63,670

1992

9,437,000

529,472

72,672

456,800

938

7,550

20,902

43,282

98,257

299,486

59,057

1993

9,478,000

516,788

75,021

441,767

933

6,740

22,601

44,747

93,143

290,333

58,291

1994

9,496,000

517,076

72,751

444,325

927

6,720

21,733

43,371

91,849

290,172

62,304

1995

9,549,000

494,903

65,680

429,223

808

5,917

17,885

41,070

86,872

280,712

61,639

1996

9,594,000

490,971

60,951

430,020

722

5,466

16,907

37,856

85,908

276,909

67,203

1997

9,774,000

480,579

57,663

422,916

759

5,070

14,934

36,900

80,726

276,863

65,327

1998

9,817,000

459,720

60,947

398,773

721

4,946

15,293

39,987

82,249

258,186

58,338

1999

9,863,775

426,596

56,709

369,887

695

4,849

14,103

37,062

76,736

236,351

56,800

2000

9,938,444

408,456

55,159

353,297

669

5,025

13,712

35,753

69,790

227,783

55,724

2001

10,006,266

407,777

55,424

352,353

672

5,264

12,937

36,551

72,038

226,708

53,607

2002

10,043,221

389,366

54,306

335,060

678

5,364

11,847

36,417

70,970

214,367

49,723

2003

10,082,364

382, 115

51,550

330,565

612

5,470

11,254

34,214

68,316

208,538

53,711

2004

10,104,206

359,542

49,737

309,805

643

5,482

11,336

32,276

64,233

194,988

50,584

2005

10,100,833

368,728

55,936

312,892

629

5,199

13,348

36,760

70,527

194,090

48,275

2006

10,095,643

380,029

56,778

324,351

713

5,269

14,208

36,588

76,107

198,227

50,017

2007

10,071,822

362,763

53,988

308,775

676

4,579

13,414

35,319

75,428

191,196

42,151

2008

10,003,422

344,741

50,166

293,585

542

4,502

12,964

32,158

74,176

183,168

36,241

B. Where do Michigan arrests occur?

Arrests by county are compiled annually. Wayne County had the highest number of arrests in 2008 with a total 65,113, or 21% of the total arrests in Michigan,[1] a decrease from both 2007 where there were 71,970 arrests, and from 2006 which had 75,195 arrests. Keweenaw County had the fewest arrests in 2008 with 30.

C. How many Michigan residents have felony, misdemeanor, or juvenile convictions?

Attempts were made to collect this information from several sources, including the Michigan State Police Records Division, the Michigan State Court Administrative Office, and the Michigan Department of Corrections.

All sources contacted indicated that these data are not collected by any of the governmental departments. The police keep detailed information on arrests, the Department of Corrections monitors individuals who have been sentenced to prison or parole, and the State Court Administrative Office compiles detailed information on case disposition, but not convictions. These data on dispositions do not necessarily correspond to the number of people with a criminal record because individuals are at times disposed with more than one offense.

Numerous obstacles to obtaining these data exist. If the data were to become available for a particular year, there is a lack of historical information to allow for the accumulation of the information over time to be reviewed in context. An identification number would have to be used that links cases so that individual re-offenders are not counted more than once. Additional assumptions would have to be made about migration from the state and mortality rates of ex-offenders.

D. How many convictions occur in Michigan each year?

Accurate data do not exist that reliably state the total number of convictions in Michigan each year.

The State Court Administrative Office compiles a yearly account of dispositions within the state. While disposition data is available from circuit courts and district courts, convictions are not compiled as part of the record. The data available are quite detailed and it is possible to determine how many felony or misdemeanor counts were disposed of by guilty pleas, bench trials, or jury trials within a given year.

This does not directly correspond with the actual number of convictions in any given year in Michigan and any number obtained by this method would only represent an estimate, and illustrate the basis for obtaining a broad approximation of convictions in Michigan, for which, as previously noted, discrete and sound data do not exist.

Possible discrepancies that might result from this method, for example, are the inability to link a particular disposition to an arrest. Additionally, if an arrest occurs in a different year than the year the disposition for such arrest is recorded, multiple counts charged after one arrest would appear as multiple pleas.

2: Poverty

A. What is the poverty line in Michigan?

The United States Census Bureau’s poverty thresholds are the same nationwide, with no separate figures for different states, metropolitan areas, or cities.

The United States Department of Health and Human Services determined that in 2006 the poverty line was $9,800 for a single person, or $19,350 for a four person family. In 2009, the poverty level was $10,830 for a single individual, and $22,050 for a four person family.

Table 2(A)—U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

Year

First Person

Each Additional

Four-Person Family

2009

$10,830

$3,740

($22,050)

2008

10,400

3,600

( 21,200)

2007

10,210

3,480

( 20,650)

2006

9,800

3,400

( 20,000)

2005

9,570

3,260

( 19,350)

2004

9,310

3,180

( 18,850)

2003

8,980

3,140

( 18,400)

2002

8,860

3,080

( 18,100)

2001

8,590

3,020

( 17,650)

2000

8,350

2,900

( 17,050)

1999

8,240

2,820

( 16,700)

1998

8,050

2,800

( 16,450)

1997

7,890

2,720

( 16,050)

B. How many Michigan residents live below the poverty line?

The Census Bureau estimates that in 2005, there were 1,292,315 Michigan residents living in poverty, or 13% of the population, slightly higher than the national average of 12% at the time.

While the U.S. Census Bureau has not released detailed poverty rates past 2005, current estimates of the percentage of Michigan residents living in poverty are available. Michigan’s poverty rate in 2008 was 14.4%, a more than a full percentage increase from 2005. The national average also rose a full point in the same period of time. For comparison of Michigan versus the rest of the nation, the 2007 poverty estimates are provided at Table 2(B)(iii).

A 2008 U.S. Census Bureau press release sheds light on the likely increase of Michigan residents living in poverty in the immediate future. While the median household income rose during the sample period of 2006 to 2007 in 33 states, the release highlights Michigan as the only state in the nation to experience a decline in household income during the period. Michigan was also the only state in the nation to see an increase in the state poverty rate during the same period.

Table 2(B)(i)—U.S. Census Bureau, Michigan Poverty Rates, 2005

State and County

Number

90% Confidence Interval[2]

Percent

90% Confidence Interval

Michigan

1,292,315

1,271,715 to 1,312,916

13.1

12.9 to 13.4

Alcona County

1,753

1,434 to 2,072

15.4

12.6 to 18.2

Alger County

1,156

934 to 1,379

13.4

10.8 to 15.9

Allegan County

10,627

9,168 to 12,086

9.6

8.3 to 10.9

Alpena County

4,094

3,403 to 4,785

13.7

11.4 to 16.1

Antrim County

2,488

2,040 to 2,936

10.3

8.5 to 12.2

Arenac County

2,859

2,395 to 3,322

17.6

14.7 to 20.4

Baraga County

1,017

821 to 1,212

13.0

10.5 to 15.5

Barry County

5,042

4,123 to 5,962

8.5

7.0 to 10.1

Bay County

12,021

10,337 to 13,704

11.2

9.7 to 12.8

Benzie County

1,450

1,182 to 1,718

8.4

6.8 to 9.9

Berrien County

27,682

24,109 to 31,255

17.6

15.3 to 19.8

Branch County

5,524

4,637 to 6,411

13.0

10.9 to 15.1

Calhoun County

19,171

16,742 to 21,600

14.3

12.5 to 16.1

Cass County

6,435

5,437 to 7,433

12.6

10.7 to 14.6

Charlevoix County

2,655

2,154 to 3,157

10.1

8.2 to 12.0

Cheboygan County

3,794

3,153 to 4,434

14.0

11.7 to 16.4

Chippewa County

5,400

4,461 to 6,339

16.5

13.6 to 19.3

Clare County

5,510

4,667 to 6,354

17.8

15.1 to 20.5

Clinton County

5,405

4,714 to 6,097

7.9

6.9 to 8.9

Crawford County

2,242

1,800 to 2,684

15.7

12.6 to 18.8

Delta County

4,401

3,720 to 5,081

11.7

9.9 to 13.5

Dickinson County

3,093

2,544 to 3,642

11.3

9.3 to 13.3

Eaton County

9,743

8,228 to 11,257

9.3

7.8 to 10.7

Emmet County

3,069

2,530 to 3,609

9.3

7.7 to 11.0

Genesee County

69,906

62,946 to 76,865

16.0

14.4 to 17.6

Gladwin County

4,810

4,066 to 5,554

18.0

15.2 to 20.7

Gogebic County

2,602

2,129 to 3,076

17.2

14.0 to 20.3

Grand Traverse County

6,644

5,571 to 7,716

8.2

6.9 to 9.5

Gratiot County

4,823

4,028 to 5,619

13.0

10.8 to 15.1

Hillsdale County

6,450

5,512 to 7,388

14.2

12.1 to 16.3

Houghton County

6,067

5,197 to 6,937

18.7

16.0 to 21.4

Huron County

3,949

3,363 to 4,536

11.7

9.9 to 13.4

Ingham County

48,188

43,619 to 52,756

18.5

16.7 to 20.2

Ionia County

6,342

5,365 to 7,320

11.0

9.3 to 12.7

Iosco County

3,878

3,212 to 4,544

14.7

12.1 to 17.2

Iron County

1,610

1,301 to 1,919

13.8

11.1 to 16.4

Isabella County

13,426

11,913 to 14,939

22.9

20.3 to 25.5

Jackson County

20,372

17,667 to 23,077

13.4

11.6 to 15.2

Kalamazoo County

34,922

31,010 to 38,833

15.2

13.5 to 16.9

Kalkaska County

2,309

1,868 to 2,750

13.6

11.0 to 16.2

Kent County

70,474

64,678 to 76,270

12.1

11.1 to 13.1

Keweenaw County

318

254 to 382

15.2

12.1 to 18.2

Lake County

2,510

2,065 to 2,955

22.4

18.5 to 26.4

Lapeer County

6,492

5,467 to 7,518

7.1

6.0 to 8.3

Leelanau County

1,536

1,230 to 1,842

7.0

5.6 to 8.4

Lenawee County

8,826

7,322 to 10,330

9.1

7.6 to 10.7

Livingston County

7,944

6,621 to 9,267

4.4

3.7 to 5.2

Luce County

1,022

818 to 1,227

17.9

14.3 to 21.5

Mackinac County

1,163

946 to 1,380

10.5

8.5 to 12.4

Macomb County

70,151

63,867 to 76,435

8.6

7.8 to 9.3

Manistee County

3,001

2,497 to 3,506

12.6

10.5 to 14.7

Marquette County

8,333

7,043 to 9,623

13.8

11.7 to 15.9

Mason County

3,675

3,061 to 4,289

12.9

10.8 to 15.1

Mecosta County

7,268

6,166 to 8,370

18.7

15.8 to 21.5

Menominee County

3,151

2,571 to 3,731

12.9

10.5 to 15.2

Midland County

9,645

8,164 to 11,127

11.7

9.9 to 13.5

Missaukee County

2,385

1,959 to 2,811

15.9

13.0 to 18.7

Monroe County

13,995

11,818 to 16,173

9.2

7.8 to 10.6

Montcalm County

8,128

6,870 to 9,385

13.3

11.3 to 15.4

Montmorency County

1,565

1,260 to 1,871

15.2

12.3 to 18.2

Muskegon County

25,331

22,273 to 28,388

15.0

13.2 to 16.8

Newaygo County

6,441

5,436 to 7,446

13.1

11.1 to 15.2

Oakland County

80,946

73,780 to 88,112

6.8

6.2 to 7.4

Oceana County

5,143

4,294 to 5,991

18.7

15.6 to 21.7

Ogemaw County

3,854

3,208 to 4,500

17.9

14.9 to 20.9

Ontonagon County

930

748 to 1,113

13.0

10.4 to 15.5

Osceola County

3,702

3,059 to 4,345

15.9

13.1 to 18.7

Oscoda County

1,692

1,357 to 2,026

18.4

14.7 to 22.0

Otsego County

2,438

1,958 to 2,918

10.0

8.0 to 12.0

Ottawa County

16,991

14,374 to 19,607

6.9

5.9 to 8.0

Presque Isle County

1,654

1,368 to 1,939

11.8

9.7 to 13.8

Roscommon County

4,045

3,339 to 4,750

15.8

13.0 to 18.5

Saginaw County

35,108

31,332 to 38,884

17.4

15.6 to 19.3

St. Clair County

16,449

13,944 to 18,953

9.7

8.2 to 11.2

St. Joseph County

8,203

6,878 to 9,528

13.3

11.2 to 15.5

Sanilac County

5,925

4,962 to 6,887

13.5

11.3 to 15.7

Schoolcraft County

1,211

972 to 1,451

14.4

11.6 to 17.3

Shiawassee County

6,849

5,725 to 7,973

9.5

8.0 to 11.1

Tuscola County

6,510

5,456 to 7,563

11.4

9.6 to 13.3

Van Buren County

11,802

9,951 to 13,653

15.4

13.0 to 17.8

Washtenaw County

42,517

38,060 to 46,973

13.3

11.9 to 14.7

Wayne County

385,899

365,686 to 406,112

19.7

18.7 to 20.7

Wexford County

4,164

3,482 to 4,846

13.3

11.1 to 15.5

Table 2(B)(ii)—Percent of People Below Poverty Level in 2007

1

Mississippi

20.6

+/-0.7

2

Louisiana

18.6

+/-0.5

3

New Mexico

18.1

+/-0.8

4

Arkansas

17.9

+/-0.6

5

Kentucky

17.3

+/-0.5

6

Alabama

16.9

+/-0.5

6

West Virginia

16.9

+/-0.6

8

District of Columbia

16.4

+/-1.4

9

Texas

16.3

+/-0.2

10

Oklahoma

15.9

+/-0.5

10

Tennessee

15.9

+/-0.5

12

South Carolina

15.0

+/-0.5

13

Georgia

14.3

+/-0.3

13

North Carolina

14.3

+/-0.3

15

Arizona

14.2

+/-0.5

16

Montana

14.1

+/-0.8

17

Michigan

14.0

+/-0.3

18

New York

13.7

+/-0.2

19

Ohio

13.1

+/-0.3

19

South Dakota

13.1

+/-0.8

 

United States

13.0

+/-0.1

21

Missouri

13.0

+/-0.4

22

Oregon

12.9

+/-0.5

23

California

12.4

+/-0.2

24

Indiana

12.3

+/-0.3

25

Florida

12.1

+/-0.2

25

Idaho

12.1

+/-0.6

25

North Dakota

12.1

+/-0.9

28

Colorado

12.0

+/-0.4

28

Maine

12.0

+/-0.6

28

Rhode Island

12.0

+/-0.9

31

Illinois

11.9

+/-0.3

32

Pennsylvania

11.6

+/-0.3

33

Washington

11.4

+/-0.3

34

Kansas

11.2

+/-0.5

34

Nebraska

11.2

+/-0.5

36

Iowa

11.0

+/-0.5

37

Wisconsin

10.8

+/-0.3

38

Nevada

10.7

+/-0.7

39

Delaware

10.5

+/-0.9

40

Vermont

10.1

+/-0.9

41

Massachusetts

9.9

+/-0.3

41

Virginia

9.9

+/-0.3

43

Utah

9.7

+/-0.5

44

Minnesota

9.5

+/-0.3

45

Alaska

8.9

+/-0.8

46

Wyoming

8.7

+/-1.2

47

New Jersey

8.6

+/-0.3

48

Maryland

8.3

+/-0.4

49

Hawaii

8.0

+/-0.5

50

Connecticut

7.9

+/-0.4

51

New Hampshire

7.1

+/-0.6

Table 2(B)(iii)—Press Release Excerpts

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE TUESDAY, AUG. 26, 2008, 10:10 A.M. EDT

Household Income Rises, Poverty Rate Unchanged, Number of Uninsured Down

Real median household income in the United States climbed 1.3 percent between 2006 and 2007, reaching $50,233, according to a report released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. This is the third annual increase in real median household income . . . . Meanwhile, the nation’s official poverty rate in 2007 was 12.5 percent, not statistically different from 2006.

***
American Community Survey (ACS) (Provides state, county, and city statistics)
***

Income

  • In the 2007 ACS, median household income ranged from $68,080 for Maryland to $36,338 for Mississippi. (The median income for Mississippi was not significantly different from that for West Virginia.)
  • Median household incomes for 18 states and the District of Columbia were above the U.S. median in 2007, while 29 states were below it. Three states had 2007 median household incomes that were not statistically different from the U.S. median.
  • Real median household income rose between the 2006 ACS and the 2007 ACS for 33 states, while one state (Michigan) experienced a decline (emphasis added).

***

Poverty

  • In the 2007 ACS, among states and the District of Columbia, poverty rates ranged from 7.1 percent for New Hampshire to 20.6 percent for Mississippi.
  • In the 2007 ACS, there were 29 states in which poverty rates were lower than the national average; for 17 states and the District of Columbia, they were higher.
  • For 12 states and the District of Columbia, poverty rates declined from the 2006 to the 2007 ACS: Alaska, California, Florida, Hawaii, Kansas, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Utah. The only state where the poverty rate increased was Michigan (emphasis added).

C. What are the foreclosure rates in Michigan?

In 2009, the Mortgage Bankers Association estimated that 1 out of every 200 homes will be foreclosed upon, resulting in 250,000 new foreclosures every three months.

Recent years have shown a sharp increase in foreclosure filings. According to Realtytrac’s 2009 Foreclosure Report (Table 2(C)(i)), in the United States there were 306,627 total foreclosure filings in 2009. This was an 18% increase from 2008. Between 2007-2008, there was an 81% increase in foreclosure filings, and remarkably, between 2006-2007 there was a 225% increase from 2006 foreclosure filings.

Michigan had the 6th most foreclosure filings in the country in 2009, with 15,988 new filings and a 2009 total of 106,058 properties with filings. Michigan’s largest metropolitan area (Detroit, Livonia, Dearborn) had a high foreclosure rate of 4.52% (Table 2(C)(ii)) and was ranked tenth in the country for U.S. metro market foreclosures in 2008. The 2008 figure of 4.52% reflects a decrease of 7.67% from 2007 rates. As of the third quarter of 2009, however, Detroit had fallen to 40th in the nation; conversely, Lansing-East Lansing area was specifically mentioned as a new “foreclosure hot-spot” because of its 41 percent year-over-year rise in foreclosure activity.[3]

Table 2(C)(i)—U.S. Foreclosure Market Data by State—November 2009

Rate Rank

State Name

Total Foreclosure Filings

Total Properties with Filings

% Change from Oct 2009

% Change from Nov 2008

% Change 2007-2008

% Change 2006-2007

--

U.S.

306,627

2,330,483

-7.72

18.35

81.24

224.80

31

Alabama

2,145

7,764

-12.34

249.92*

39.34

184.19

33

Alaska

272

1,946

-10.53

51.96

46.10

96.76

4

Arizona

14,349

116,911

7.52

9.23

203.13

655.04

26

Arkansas

1,572

14,277

-16.91

1.95

122.87

198.06

3

California

73,995

523,624

-13.38

22.32

109.86

497.91

11

Colorado

5,204

50,396

3.11

-2.31

27.90

61.41

20

Connecticut

2,114

21,925

-8.33

-3.69

84.87

570.49

29

Delaware

443

2,516

0.91

87.71

151.85*

701.27*

District of Columbia

362

4,182

40.31

5.23

438.22*

3245.60*

2

Florida

52,935

385,309

1.97

7.61

133.11

411.68

12

Georgia

9,664

85,254

-22.49

-3.39

44.36

117.07

15

Hawaii

872

3,185

-5.73

121.88

229.71

489.81

5

Idaho

2,432

8,512

-1.58

89.41*

133.85

302.08

7

Illinois

16,422

99,488

-17.67

107.64

54.70

126.01

17

Indiana

4,213

45,937

-3.94

-6.02

64.18

113.59

42

Iowa

622

5,385

47.04

19.16

31.25

135.77

37

Kansas

878

6,218

-5.49

34.01

155.46

179.96

40

Kentucky

1,007

7,244

-13.49

135.83

41.90

45.46

32

Louisiana

1,793

7,129

40.74*

255.75*

79.66

111.42

41

Maine

365

2,851

0.55

21.67

896.85*

5602.00*

9

Maryland

6,370

32,338

-4.37

83.57

71.29

945.18

19

Massachusetts

4,005

44,342

-25.98

76.35

150.00

577.08

6

Michigan

15,988

106,058

-2.91

9.55**

21.61

107.89

18

Minnesota

3,433

20,282

15.09

56.97

75.50

336.74

46

Mississippi

333

2,293

-38.22

148.51*

62.74

181.35

27

Missouri

3,217

31,254

-0.03

11.51†

33.04

139.11

43

Montana

154

1,246

45.28

165.52

8.35

32.55

45

Nebraska

216

3,190

75.61

500.00

-12.27

25.84

1

Nevada

9,295

77,693

-32.85

-33.43

125.74

529.50

25

New Hampshire

755

6,636

-15.83

12.52

436.03*

5430.00*

10

New Jersey

9,227

62,514

24.10

65.30

101.20

186.84

38

New Mexico

552

3,727

-55.63

150.91*

24.48

38.29

39

New York

4,401

50,032

-8.26

69.20

29.32

129.23

36

North Carolina

3,273

33,819

-5.05

17.19

16.21

153.14

48

North Dakota

46

371

-22.03

-16.36

48.40

148.99

13

Ohio

10,587

113,570

-9.09

-17.82

26.22

155.40

34

Oklahoma

1,477

12,465

-4.83

44.95*

50.98

32.86

14

Oregon

2,855

18,001

-9.65

-3.71

112.75

168.67

35

Pennsylvania

4,965

37,210

-10.46

24.94

127.18

68.88

21

Rhode Island

656

6,583

-27.35

-26.70

258.16*

1525.43*

30

South Carolina

2,219

14,995

-23.19

9.80

253.07*

220.41*

44

South Dakota

108

402

2.86

140.00

1575.00*

793.33*

23

Tennessee

3,725

44,153

-7.57

7.44

70.38

127.87

24

Texas

12,095

96,157

2.52

54.21

13.84

14.96

8

Utah

2,670

14,836

11.11

33.30

99.46

68.25

50

Vermont

16

137

6.67

-27.27

372.41*

705.88*

22

Virginia

4,590

49,011

-16.30

-19.39†

200.55

1746.68*

28

Washington

3,288

26,058

-1.47

15.45

71.61

116.64

49

West Virginia

114

685

14.00

235.29

48.91

170.75

16

Wisconsin

4,294

19,695

-0.39

118.30

62.33

249.02

47

Wyoming

 

677

-33.33

-56.00

90.17

165.49

*Actual increase may not be as high due to data collection changes or improvements

**Collection of records classified as Notice of Default (NOD) began in August 2009 because of change in state law
† Collection of some records previously classified as NOD in this state was discontinued starting in January 2009

Table 2(C)(ii)Top 10 U.S. Metro Foreclosure Market Data Properties with Foreclosure Filings—3rd Quarter 2009

Rate Rank

Metro Name

Total

%Housing Units

1/every X HU*

%Change from Q2 2009

%Change from Q3 2008

--

U.S. Total

937,840

0.73

136

5.40

22.50

1

Las Vegas-Paradise, NV Total

40,408

5.13

20

8.82

53.62

2

Merced, CA Total

3,092

3.72

27

-13.32

-11.12

3

Cape Coral-Fort Myers, FL Total

13,206

3.67

27

-5.19

-2.19

4

Stockton, CA Total

8,000

3.53

28

1.63

-3.05

5

Modesto, CA Total

5,883

3.39

30

-3.03

-0.12

6

Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA Total

48,416

3.37

30

-7.91

11.83

7

Bakersfield, CA Total

7,753

2.88

35

-7.64

14.25

8

Vallejo-Fairfield, CA Total

4,266

2.85

35

-3.83

-3.37

9

Reno-Sparks, NV Total

4,787

2.67

37

14.17

80.44

10

Port St. Lucie, FL Total

5,434

2.63

38

28.19

40.05

40

Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI Total**

21,978

1.16

86

7.35

1.89

45

Flint, MI Total**

1,787

0.91

110

5.61

25.93

50

Lansing-East Lansing, MI Total**

1,653

0.84

119

4.95

40.92

54

Grand Rapids-Wyoming, MI Total**

2,415

0.76

132

8.93

25.52

59

Holland-Grand Haven, MI Total**

718

0.72

140

25.09

124.38

70

Ann Arbor, MI Total**

880

0.60

167

20.05

-12.70

88

Saginaw-Saginaw Township North, MI Total**

433

0.49

205

0.46

9.34

91

Kalamazoo-Portage, MI Total**

684

0.47

211

-7.07

31.29

118

South Bend-Mishawaka, IN-MI Total

562

0.40

248

-1.40

-25.37

* This data can be read as “One out of every X housing units has a foreclosure filing in this metro area.”
** Collection of records classified as Notice of Default (NOD) began in August 2009 because of change in state law
† Collection of some records previously classified as NOD in this state was discontinued starting in January 2009

D. How many homeless veterans are in Michigan?

Due to the nature of homelessness, statistics estimating the number of homeless veterans at any given point vary greatly. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s 2008 Annual Homelessness Assessment Report estimates that on an average night in January 2008, there were 664,414 homeless people in the United States. The United States Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) estimates that on any given night, 131,000 of those who are homeless are veterans (male and female), or 19% of the homeless population.

Other estimates pin the overall percentage of homeless veterans vs. homed non-veterans at a much higher ratio. The National Coalition for the Homeless states that approximately 40% of homeless men are veterans.

While there is relatively little state-specific information regarding homeless veterans available, the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans has estimated the number of homeless veterans for each state. The Coalition estimates that there were 3,513 homeless veterans in Michigan during 2006 (Table 2(D). However, it is important to note that the Coalition’s national estimate of homeless veterans is higher than the VA’s estimate by roughly 50,000, so the state-specific estimates may be overbroad.

Table 2(D)—Number of Homeless Veterans and VA Beds by State, 2006

State

Funded Beds

Homeless Veterans

AK

0

600

AL

42

824

AR

40

850

AZ

199

3,970

CA

1,875

49,724

CO

102

1,203

CT

103

5,000

DC

43

2,500

DE

15

550

FL

430

18,910

GA

165

3,297

HI

118

800

IA

56

547

ID

10

500

IL

136

2,197

IN

108

1,200

KS

47

601

KY

115

425

LA

150

9,950

MA

378

1,700

MD

241

3,300

ME

0

100

MI

139

3,513

MN

23

523

MO

82

3,325

MS

60

1,579

MT

17

232

NC

182

1,659

ND

0

1,000

NE

12

770

NH

36

257

NJ

142

6,500

NM

30

860

NV

201

4,715

NY

274

21,147

OH

261

1,710

OK

27

500

OR

159

5,891

PA

332

2,784

RI

23

175

SC

110

1,375

SD

42

170

TN

241

2,844

TX

233

15,967

UT

145

530

VA

86

870

VT

10

30

WA

167

6,800

WI

209

828

WV

41

347

WY

31

98

PR

12

80

TOTAL

7,700

195,827


3: Residency

A. How many non-citizens live in Michigan?

The U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Census Report estimates that of the roughly 10,000,000 people living in Michigan, 7,490,125 are Michigan residents. A large portion of the individuals living in Michigan who are not residents is comprised of:

  • 1,867,691 people living in Michigan who are residents of states other than Michigan; and
  • 283,634 individuals who are not U.S. citizens

Table 3(A)—Profile of Selected Social Characteristics: 2000

NATIVITY AND PLACE OF BIRTH

Total population

9,938,444

100.0

Native

9,414,855

94.7

Born in United States

9,357,816

94.2

State of residence

7,490,125

75.4

Different state

1,867,691

18.8

Born outside United States

57,039

0.6

Foreign born

523,589

5.3

Entered 1990 to March 2000

235,269

2.4

Naturalized citizen

239,955

2.4

Not a citizen

283,634

2.9

REGION OF BIRTH OF FOREIGN BORN

Total (excluding born at sea)

523,585

100.0

Europe

156,988

30.0

Asia

209,416

40.0

Africa

16,735

3.2

Oceania

2,083

0.4

Latin America

88,704

16.9

Northern America

49,659

9.5

B. How many illegal aliens live in Michigan?

There is no definitive source for current illegal alien estimates for Michigan. The 2000 Census estimated that there were around 70,000 illegal aliens residing in the state. An organization called FAIR (Federation for Immigration Reform) has developed a formula they claim accurately estimates the number of illegal aliens residing in a given state.  FAIR’s estimate for Michigan shows 200,000 illegal aliens residing within state boarders. However, it should be noted that the FAIR formula does not compensate for the varying matriculation numbers for individual states.

Table 3(B)—FAIR Extended Immigration Data for Michigan

SUMMARY DEMOGRAPHIC STATE DATA (AND SOURCE)

Population (2007 FAIR estimate):

10,071,822

Population (2000 Census):

9,938,444

Refugee Admission (DHS 1997-2007):

18,161

Illegal Alien Population (2007 FAIR est.):

200,000

Projected Population—2050 (2006 FAIR):

13,124,190

C. How many people residing in Michigan would need a language translator in court?

While there is no source for an estimated number of people in Michigan who would require an interpreter if they were to appear in court, data exist that ascertain the varying degrees of English proficiency within the state, along with the number of individuals who are hearing impaired.

A 2007 U.S. Census Bureau estimate which provides that there are roughly 850,865 Michigan residents to whom English is not their primary language.[4] Of those 850,865 people, 322,362 speak English less than “very well.” However, speaking English less than “very well” does not automatically qualify an individual as for a court provided translator.

A 2005 report compiled by the Division of Deaf and Hard of Hearing of the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth estimates that there are around 90,000 deaf individuals living in Michigan.[5] The report also provides an estimate for deaf individuals by county, as well as the state total.

Table 3(C)(i)—U.S. Census 2007 Estimates

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME

Population 5 years and over

9,435,733

+/-1,904

100%

(X)

English only

8,584,868

+/-15,801

91.0%

+/-0.2

Language other than English

850,865

+/-15,626

9.0%

+/-0.2

Speak English less than "very well"

323,362

+/-10,245

3.4%

+/-0.1

Spanish

286,793

+/-8,504

3.0%

+/-0.1

Speak English less than "very well"

121,234

+/-5,835

1.3%

+/-0.1

Other Indo-European languages

284,498

+/-10,712

3.0%

+/-0.1

Speak English less than "very well"

87,720

+/-6,157

0.9%

+/-0.1

Asian and Pacific Islander languages

134,168

+/-6,487

1.4%

+/-0.1

Speak English less than "very well"

59,761

+/-4,734

0.6%

+/-0.1

Other languages

145,406

+/-10,017

1.5%

+/-0.1

Speak English less than "very well"

54,647

+/-6,069

0.6%

+/-0.1

Table 3(C)(ii)—Estimated Deaf/Hard of Hearing Populations by Michigan Counties

February, 2005

LOCATION

POPULATION

HEARING LOSS

DEAF

HARD OF HEARING

Michigan

10,079,985

866,879

90,720

776,159

County

Alcona

11,572

995

104

891

Alger

9,767

840

88

752

Allegan

110,331

9,488

993

8,495

Alpena

30,781

2,647

277

2,370

Antrim

24,094

2,072

217

1,855

Arenac

17,309

1,489

156

1,333

Baraga

8,782

755

79

676

Barry

58,774

5,055

529

4,526

Bay

109,452

9,413

985

8,428

Benzie

17,078

1,469

154

1,315

Berrien

162,766

13,998

1,465

12,533

Branch

46,414

3,992

418

3,574

Calhoun

138,854

11,941

1,250

10,692

Cass

51,385

4,419

462

3,957

Charlevoix

26,712

2,297

240

2,057

Cheboygan

27,405

2,357

247

2,110

Chippewa

38,822

3,339

349

2,989

Clare

31,589

2,717

284

2,432

Clinton

67,609

5,814

608

5,206

Crawford

14,808

1,273

133

1,140

Delta

38,317

3,295

345

2,950

Dickinson

27,186

2,338

245

2,093

Eaton

106,197

9,133

956

8,177

Emmet

32,741

2,816

295

2,521

Genesee

442,250

38,034

3,980

34,053

Gladwin

26,939

2,317

242

2,074

Gogebic

17,329

1,490

156

1,334

Grand Traverse

82,011

7,053

738

6,315

Gratiot

42,501

3,655

383

3,273

Hillsdale

47,230

4,062

425

3,637

Houghton

36,249

3,117

326

2,791

Huron

35,216

3,029

317

2,712

Ingham

282,030

24,255

2,538

21,716

Ionia

63,573

5,467

572

4,895

Iosco

26,888

2,312

242

2,070

Iron

12,787

1,100

115

985

Isabella

64,663

5,561

582

4,979

Jackson

162,321

13,960

1,461

12,499

Kalamazoo

242,110

20,821

2,179

18,642

Kalkaska

17,177

1,477

155

1,323

Kent

590,417

50,776

5,314

45,462

Keweenaw

2,227

192

20

171

Lake

11,795

1,014

106

908

Lapeer

91,314

7,853

822

7,031

Leelanau

21,860

1,880

197

1,683

Lenawee

100,786

8,668

907

7,761

Livingston

172,881

14,868

1,556

13,312

Luce

6,919

595

62

533

Mackinac

11,470

986

103

883

Macomb

813,948

70,000

7,326

62,674

Manistee

25,317

2,177

228

1,949

Marquette

64,616

5,557

582

4,975

Mason

28,685

2,467

258

2,209

Mecosta

41,728

3,589

376

3,213

Menominee

25,084

2,157

226

1,931

Midland

84,492

7,266

760

6,506

Missaukee

15,189

1,306

137

1,170

Monroe

150,673

12,958

1,356

11,602

Montcalm

62,926

5,412

566

4,845

Montmorency

10,492

902

94

808

Muskegon

173,090

14,886

1,558

13,328

Newaygo

49,271

4,237

443

3,794

Oakland

1,207,869

103,877

10,871

93,006

Oceana

28,074

2,414

253

2,162

Ogemaw

21,792

1,874

196

1,678

Ontonogon

7,571

651

68

583

Osceola

23,509

2,022

212

1,810

Oscoda

9,461

814

85

728

Otsego

24,268

2,087

218

1,869

Ottawa

249,391

21,448

2,245

19,203

Presque Isle

14,286

1,229

129

1,100

Roscommon

26,230

2,256

236

2,020

Saginaw

209,327

18,002

1,884

16,118

St. Clair

169,063

14,539

1,522

13,018

St. Joseph

62,864

5,406

566

4,841

Sanilac

44,583

3,834

401

3,433

Schoolcraft

8,772

754

79

675

Shiawassee

72,543

6,239

653

5,586

Tuscola

58,382

5,021

525

4,495

Van Buren

78,210

6,726

704

6,022

Washtenaw

338,562

29,116

3,047

26,069

Wayne

2,028,778

174,475

18,259

156,216

Wexford

31,251

2,688

281

2,406

D. How many Native Americans live in Michigan?

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that as of 2006, there were 60,820 Native Americans living in Michigan.

Table 3(D)—2006 Michigan Race-Ethnic Population Estimates

TOTAL POPULATION

10,095,643

One race

9,945,344

White or Caucasian

8,198,927

Black or African American

1,444,451

American Indian and Alaska Native

60,820

Asian

237,389

Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander

3,757

Two or more races

150,299

Race alone or in combination with one or more other races

White or Caucasian

8,334,225

Black or African American

1,518,332

American Indian and Alaska Native

122,254

Asian

271,840

Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander

8,438


4. Literacy

A: What is the extent of illiteracy in Michigan?

There have been three comprehensive studies conducted on the extent of illiteracy in the United States in the past 30 years. The first study, the National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS), was a literacy survey conducted by the Department of Education in 1992 and again in 2003. The survey was based on interviews of approximately 26,000 individuals, and was reported at the national level. The NALS used a set of questions designed to test an individual’s ability to comprehend prose literacy (the ability to understand and use information contained in various kinds of textual material), document literacy (the ability to process information from charts, tables, schedules, and the like), and quantitative literacy (the ability to take a set of figures located throughout a document and compute them into useful knowledge, such as balancing a checkbook).

Each question was given a numerical value, and based on the individual’s total score, they were placed into a level of literacy. Level 1 is the lowest level of literacy, and the NALS found that roughly 21-23 percent of American adults function at a level 1 literacy level. It is important to note that Level 1 is not classified as “illiterate,” but rather

“[t]hough all adults in this level displayed limited skills, their characteristics are diverse. Many adults in this level performed simple, routine tasks involving brief and uncomplicated texts and documents. For example, they were able to total an entry on a deposit slip, locate the time or place of a meeting on a form, and identify a piece of specific information in a brief news article. Others were unable to perform these types of tasks, and some had such limited skills that they were unable to respond to much of the survey.”

NALS also evaluated the literacy proficiency of inmates in federal and state prisons. One thousand individuals within the prison population were surveyed for the 1992 National Adult Literacy Survey. The prison population scored significantly lower than the rest of the population, with the majority of individuals scoring within Levels 1 and 2.

In 1998, The State of Illiteracy in America study was conducted to better understand the literacy proficiency of individuals at state and local levels. The study used statistics from NALS, combined with information from the 1990 U.S. Census, to estimate literacy at a much narrower scope. The estimates were based on a model that predicted Level 1 NALS proficiency levels from demographic characteristics such as English proficiency, income level, education, and other factors.

The State of Illiteracy in America estimates that 18% of Michigan’s population functions at a Level 1 literacy proficiency level, the national average hovering around 21% to 23% of the population functioning at this level. In Michigan, the two counties with the highest level of residents estimated to be at Level 1 proficiency are Lake County and Wayne County. The 1993 NALS study further estimates literacy levels at municipalities within the state with populations of over 5,000 people. Benton Harbor (57%), Highland Park (56%), and Detroit (47%) top the list of estimated residents with Level 1 literacy proficiency levels.

In 2003, the National Center for Education Statistics conducted a survey of roughly 19,000 individuals in an attempt to determine the progress (or decline) of literacy proficiency since the 1992 NALS survey. The study was titled the 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy (2003 NALS), and used the same basic testing principles as used in the 1992 survey. The study did not place proficiency levels in the same format as the 1992 survey using numerical indicators; rather, it rates participants on four performance levels: Below Basic, Basic, Intermediate, and Proficient. The study used small area estimation techniques to arrive at literacy estimates for counties and original samples.

The 2003 NALS findings show that while there been a slight decrease in prose literacy and document literacy between 1992 and 2003, the changes are not significant (see, page 58). There has, however, been an increase in the average quantitative proficiency levels of 9 points. Experts suggest this is likely due to the vast increase in the use of computers by the general population over the period. As more adults are using computers, abilities to synthesize large amounts data are also increasing.

For Michigan estimates of literacy, see Michigan literacy estimates by county, and by Michigan municipality.

Table 4(A)—Indirect estimate of percent lacking basic prose literacy skills[6] and corresponding credible intervals in all counties: Michigan 2003

Location

FIPS code 0

Population size 1

Percent lacking basic
prose literacy skills 2

95% credible interval 3

Lower bound

Upper bound

Michigan

26000

7,629,134

8

6.2

11.0

Alcona County

26001

9,723

9

4.1

15.9

Alger County

26003

7,383

9

4.2

16.0

Allegan County

26005

82,958

8

4.0

15.3

Alpena County

26007

24,509

7

3.3

13.1

Antrim County

26009

19,257

7

3.3

12.7

Arenac County

26011

13,449

10

4.6

17.3

Baraga County

26013

6,521

8

3.9

15.1

Barry County

26015

45,486

7

3.1

12.4

Bay County

26017

85,460

8

3.7

14.1

Benzie County

26019

13,631

7

3.2

12.6

Berrien County

26021

123,273

9

4.2

16.2

Branch County

26023

34,177

9

4.3

16.4

Calhoun County

26025

104,591

8

3.9

15.0

Cass County

26027

40,140

8

4.0

15.4

Charlevoix County

26029

20,799

6

3.1

11.9

Cheboygan County

26031

21,759

8

3.9

14.8

Chippewa County

26033

27,151

8

3.9

15.0

Clare County

26035

24,955

9

4.4

17.1

Clinton County

26037

51,732

6

2.6

10.5

Crawford County

26039

11,589

8

3.7

14.5

Delta County

26041

30,574

7

3.1

12.3

Dickinson County

26043

21,410

8

3.5

13.8

Eaton County

26045

82,368

5

2.4

9.5

Emmet County

26047

25,376

6

2.6

10.7

Genesee County

26049

333,153

10

6.5

15.9

Gladwin County

26051

21,542

9

4.2

16.1

Gogebic County

26053

13,794

8

3.5

13.9

Grand Traverse County

26055

63,792

5

2.5

9.9

Gratiot County

26057

30,033

9

4.1

15.5

Hillsdale County

26059

35,884

8

3.9

15.0

Houghton County

26061

26,782

8

3.7

15.0

Huron County

26063

27,858

9

4.3

16.5

Ingham County

26065

209,215

6

3.0

11.3

Ionia County

26067

44,961

8

3.8

14.8

Iosco County

26069

21,743

9

4.2

15.8

Iron County

26071

10,212

9

4.1

15.5

Isabella County

26073

48,228

7

3.4

13.9

Jackson County

26075

118,845

7

3.4

12.9

Kalamazoo County

26077

181,978

6

2.9

11.6

Kalkaska County

26079

13,317

9

4.2

16.4

Kent County

26081

435,012

8

3.8

14.6

Keweenaw County

26083

1,721

8

3.6

14.0

Lake County

26085

9,262

11

5.4

20.3

Lapeer County

26087

69,519

7

3.0

12.1

Leelanau County

26089

17,640

5

2.3

9.3

Lenawee County

26091

75,194

8

3.7

14.2

Livingston County

26093

131,876

4

2.0

8.3

Luce County

26095

4,860

9

4.5

17.2

Mackinac County

26097

9,276

8

3.8

14.8

Macomb County

26099

637,170

7

3.2

12.8

Manistee County

26101

19,703

8

3.9

14.8

Marquette County

26103

50,255

6

3.0

11.9

Mason County

26105

22,784

7

3.5

13.7

Mecosta County

26107

30,946

8

3.7

14.6

Menominee County

26109

19,911

9

4.2

16.0

Midland County

26111

64,437

6

2.7

10.9

Missaukee County

26113

11,740

9

4.2

16.3

Monroe County

26115

116,018

7

3.4

13.3

Montcalm County

26117

46,673

8

3.9

14.9

Montmorency County

26119

8,704

10

4.5

17.4

Muskegon County

26121

128,146

8

4.0

15.3

Newaygo County

26123

37,200

9

4.4

16.5

Oakland County

26125

932,922

7

4.2

11.3

Oceana County

26127

21,087

10

5.0

18.6

Ogemaw County

26129

17,484

9

4.4

16.9

Ontonagon County

26131

6,288

8

3.9

15.1

Osceola County

26133

18,166

9

4.3

16.5

Oscoda County

26135

7,665

10

4.7

17.7

Otsego County

26137

18,904

7

3.1

12.2

Ottawa County

26139

182,539

7

3.2

12.4

Presque Isle County

26141

11,751

8

3.9

15.3

Roscommon County

26143

21,620

8

3.9

15.0

Saginaw County

26145

157,577

10

4.6

17.2

Sanilac County

26151

34,317

9

4.3

16.6

Schoolcraft County

26153

6,850

9

4.4

16.7

Shiawassee County

26155

55,921

7

3.4

13.1

St. Clair County

26147

130,608

7

3.1

12.5

St. Joseph County

26149

47,261

9

4.4

16.7

Tuscola County

26157

44,897

7

4.2

12.7

Van Buren County

26159

58,288

9

4.4

16.8

Washtenaw County

26161

252,410

6

2.8

11.6

Wayne County

26163

1,500,757

12

5.5

21.2

Wexford County

26165

24,167

8

3.7

14.2

* The state and county Federal Information processing Standards (FIPS) codes are standardized unique state and county identifiers. The first two positions identify the state, and the last three positions identify the county. For more information, see www.census.gov/geo/www/fips/fips.html

1 Estimated population size of persons 16 years and older in households in 2003.

2 Those lacking Basic prose literacy skills include those who scored Below Basic in prose and those who could not be tested due to language barriers.

3 The estimated percent lacking Basic prose literacy skills has a margin of error as measured by the associated credible interval. There is a 95% chance that the value of the percent lacking Basic prose literacy skills is contained between the lower and upper bound.

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, 2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy


[1] The total 2008 arrests in Michigan were 307,818.

[2] Confidence intervals are used to designate the reliability of an estimate. For more information, visit www.stat.yale.edu/Courses/1997-98/101/confint.htm

[3] Table 2(C)(ii) displays the top ten metro areas for foreclosure activity in the United States. Michigan metro areas on the comprehensive list are also included.

[4] See table 3(C)(i)

[5] See table 3(C)(ii)

[6] “The specific measure chosen to estimate literacy at the state and county levels on this website is the percentage of adults lacking Basic Prose Literacy Skills (BPLS). The literacy of adults who lack BPLS ranges from being unable to read and understand any written information in English to being able to locate easily identifiable information in short, commonplace prose text, but nothing more advanced. However, adults who were not able to take the assessment because of a language barrier are included in the indirect estimates and are classified as lacking BPLS on the grounds that they can be considered to be at the lowest level of English literacy. Users should note that the indirect estimates of the percentages of adults lacking BPLS are not comparable to the percentages of adults Below Basic in prose literacy in other NAAL or NALS published results because the latter results exclude adults who were unable to take the assessment because of a language barrier.”

     

 

follow us
Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on LinkedIn Follow Us on Twitter Follow the SBM Blog

 

©Copyright 2014

website links
Contact Us
Site Map
Website Privacy Statement PDF
Staff Links

SBM on the Mapcontact information
State Bar of Michigan
306 Townsend St
Lansing, MI 48933-2012
Phone: (517) 346-6300
Toll Free: (800) 968-1442
Fax: (517) 482-6248